Categories
D-liciously Diabetic

Just kiddin’ Chicken Parmesan Sandwhich

20120805-000837.jpg

Ok how good does that look??? It was! And not bad for 57 grams of carbs.

So, you’re probably asking why it’s called Just Kiddin’ Chicken. My husband is a vegetarian. Back when we first got married, the idea of vegetarian meats was just very foreign to me. I grew up in a Filipino household. There was no fake meat up in that place. Unless you consider spam fake. Anyhow, to get myself familiarized with the vegetarian meat variety, I started to give them my own names and so, the name “just kiddin’ chicken” was born.

The main carbohydrate choices here are the whole wheat bun (32 grams) and the just kiddin’ chick patty (16 grams). The rest is in the veggies and the tomato sauce. What makes this sandwich parmesan-y is the tomato sauce, the pinch of low fat mozzarella and parmesan cheese, the tomato, and lastly the fresh basil from my mother-in-law’s garden. That fresh basil gives it the right touch.

D-Lish!

Remember to Cut the B.S.!

Categories
AttituDe of GratituDe

Today 8/4/2012, I’m Thankful for…

a month of being back home.
over a month of healing.

Categories
inSOULin

What a difference a month makes

20120804-225416.jpg
Today marks a month since I came home from the hospital. The week I spent there took its toll on my physical, mental, and spiritual well being.

When I got home from the hospital:

  • I could not get up the stairs without my legs cramping up.
  • A lap around the couch was my workout.
  • I couldn’t get anything for myself and had to rely on my family to even get me water.
  • I was taking between 24 and 39 units of my fast-acting insulin and 25 units of my slow-acting insulin a day.
  • I could not watch television without noticing that every commercial was a commercial for food I was gonna miss.
  • I just remember feeling frustrated, sad, angry, weak, and lost.
  • Then I remember thinking to myself my first week home:

    “Well, this didn’t kill me, so I must be getting stronger.”

    That’s it. Its time to stop feeIng sorry for myself. It’s time to start making myself stronger. I knew I was still recovering from gallbladder removal surgery so I knew my limitations. I began to challenge myself by adding more laps around the couch. Then I pushed myself to go up and down the stairs a second and a third time. I began to take walks around my block. Read up on diabetic eating and the reasons for my dietary needs.

    Now that it’s been a month, I can celebrate the following:

  • I made my goal of getting up and down the stairs 54 times in one day. (once for each card in a deck of cards-including the jokers-and yes, I physically brought a card upstairs each time.)
  • I can walk on the treadmill for 30 minutes at a time at an incline.
  • I’ve taken up carrying a pedometer. I haven’t been able to do 10,000 steps in a day yet but I’m working on it.
  • I now take about 12 to 15 units of fast-acting insulin a day and only 10 units of slow acting insulin a day. Writing this just made me realize that my doses have been cut by more than half!
  • I’ve gotten back to making the meals for my family, something I take great pride in.
  • I started this blog in the hopes of helping others as well as myself.
  • The blog has a section in which I will try to continue to be thankful daily.
  • I’m very hopeful and happy to be living with diabetes instead of feeling as though I’m dying of it.
  • I’ve got a lot to be thankful for this last month and I now celebrate every day.

    Don’t forget to “cut the B.S.!”

    Categories
    AttituDe of GratituDe

    Today, 8/3/2012 I’m thankful for…

    My first ‘like.’ thanks Christine!

    Categories
    AttituDe of GratituDe

    Today, 8/2/2012, I’m Thankful for…

    Progress. Today, I received word from my endocrinologist to lower my long-acting insulin dose by six units! I’m hopeful it will help with my bouts of hypoglycemia.

    Categories
    AttituDe of GratituDe

    Today, 8/1/2012 I’m Thankful for…

    having a place to express myself.

    Categories
    getting eDucateD

    The Shakes aka Hypoglycemia

    I know, this video is random, but I thought you’d enjoy a little bit of shake humor. On to the blog post:

    Something especially new to me is the idea of hypoglycemia or what I like to call, “the shakes.” Here’s a description of hypoglycemia by the American Diabetes association:

    hypoglycemia (hy-po-gly-SEE-mee-uh) a condition that occurs when one’s blood glucose is lower than normal, usually less than 70 mg/dL. Signs include hunger, nervousness, shakiness, perspiration, dizziness or light-headedness, sleepiness, and confusion. If left untreated, hypoglycemia may lead to unconsciousness. Hypoglycemia is treated by consuming a carbohydrate-rich food such as a glucose tablet or juice. It may also be treated with an injection of glucagon if the person is unconscious or unable to swallow. Also called an insulin reaction.

    Since I’ve been home, I’ve been hypoglycemic almost daily. It’s confusing to me because I’ve always thought that a diabetic’s problem was blood sugar levels that are too high. I’m learning quickly that it is not so. A diabetic’s problem is that the blood glucose levels vary between the two extremes because the body does not know how to balance it’s own glucose levels. We as diabetics need to work closely with our doctors figure out the right combination of nutrition, physical activity, and insulin dosage.

    I used to pass this feeling off as being tired but if you feel the symptoms listed above, please don’t ignore it. Here are a few tips:

    • Be sure to follow directions provided by your doctor.
    • Be sure to educate people in your household on what to do if you cannot handle things on your own.
    • You may want to purchase a medical identification bracelet for when you’re out and about.
    • Always keep a form of quick acting carbohydrate on you just in case: A juice box, hard candy, glucose tablets -between 15-20 grams of carbs.
    • Carry your blood glucose meter with you.

    Hypoglycemia is serious business and it’s no fun to feel like you have no control of your body.

    Since writing this post, I received a call from my endocrinologist to lower my long-acting insulin dosage by 6 units. I’m so thankful for progress!

    To learn more about hypoglycemia Click here.

    Categories
    inSOULin

    Last day on the vial!

    20120731-201816.jpg

    I’m so excited! Today is my last day of using the old school vial and syringe needles. As of tomorrow, I switch over to the pen! Above is a picture of my fast acting insulin, the Novolog FlexPen which is a pre-filled syringe. It is so much easier to carry in my purse as opposed to bringing a vial and syringe or even prefilling the syringe ahead of time. The pen needles seem thinner so I don’t feel them as much. It could be that looking at a regular old school needle just messes with my mind a bit. It just looks like it will hurt and so it does. I barely even feel the pen. Tip to newbies: it helps to exhale when you stick in the needle.

    Maybe I’m also excited about switching to the pen because the Novolog FlexPen’s spokesperson is Charlie Kimball who is an Izod Indycar Series racecar driver who happens to be a diabetic. FYI, I’m a huge fan of his as well as the series. Needless to say I will be blogging more about him soon. Go Charlie!!!