Categories
Indycar

Cut the BS Interviews IndyCar Driver and Fellow T1D Charlie Kimball

What an honor it was to chat with Charlie Kimball about IndyCar Racing and T1D!

I recently had the honor and opportunity to do an interview the driver of this year’s AJ Foyt #4 Novo Nordisk Tresiba car, Charlie Kimball. Charlie Kimball is the first licensed driver with diabetes to win a race in the NTT IndyCar Series. If you know me, you know I was an IndyCar fan before my own T1D diagnosis. I woke up from DKA and thought, “Whoa, they’re using insulin to to lower my blood sugars? I hope they gave me Novolog, because that’s what Charlie Kimball uses!” And now we’re doing an interview together. I’m totally fan girling over here!

Please watch our interview above and please be sure to catch the Genesys 300 from the Texas Motor Speedway live on NBC on Saturday, 8:00pm Eastern! It’ll be such a rush! I look forward to seeing that giant screen one day!

Thank you to Charlie Kimball for taking the time to speak with us at Cut the BS…I Mean Blood Sugar! I had a blast doing this interview so let me know in the comments below who we should invite next!

Thanks so much for reading as always remember to

Love Deeply,

Laugh Often,

and always Cut the BS!

Categories
AttituDe of GratituDe

Things to Do During Quarantine

Hi Everyone!  It’s me…your Cut The BS Girl!

All this COVID-19 stuff, self-quarantining, and social distancing got us thinking of our community and how we can help.  We thought it would be a great opportunity to share with everyone a few ways to spend this time so here we go:

  • Going for a walk
  • Bake that beer bread recipe you’ve always wanted to try
  • Play hide and go seek
  • Learn a new dance
  • Check my blood sugar
  • Drinking juice to get myself back in range
  • Refill my Glucose Tabs
  • Have a drink with my boo

There’s so much we could be doing during this time!  We could be spending with ourselves,  with our loved ones, and of course, with our diabetes. 

So yea be sure to stay well,

Stay positive and

Always…always Cut the BS!

 

Please tell us in the comments below how you are spending this time!  We’d love to spend our time reading what everyone is doing!

 

Categories
getting eDucateD

Co-Hostess with the Most-est

CBS summit 2020

If you know me, you know that I’m kind of a “yes” girl.  Even if it pushes me out of my comfort zone, I have said, “Yes!”  This time is no different.

On Saturday, February 29, 2020, I will be spending the day with hundreds of other families living with Type 1 Diabetes.  Why do you ask?  I have been asked to co-host this year’s JDRF TypeOneNation Summit!  It is an honor to be asked and although I’ve got the butterflies-in-the tummy feeling, I have given our local JDRF office a resounding, “Yes!”

Let’s do this!

Let me tell you.  I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE the JDRF TypeOneNation Summit.  It has become one of my favorite events of the year!  It is super informative.  It’s my go to for the most recent Type One Diabetes research updates.  We get to listen to uplifting keynote speakers.  We get to select from a great number of in-depth breakout sessions that are applicable to us ranging from clinical trials, insurance updates, to PEAK (T1D Performance in Exercise and Knowledge) which is JDRF’s new fitness based program.

Some of you who have been to my Adult T1D Talk Lounge Sessions in the past have already asked, “Why is this not an option this year, Cut the BS Girl?”  Here’s the inside scoop: This year, we’re changing it up with something a little different called, T1D Table Talks, where I will be facilitating the Adults with T1D table talk.  If you’ve been to my T1D Talk Lounge in the past, this will have a similar feel, but will have grown to a whole room of people doing it at different age groups and different topics!  Yasss!

If you or someone you know has Type One Diabetes and want to connect with others with T1D including myself click here and sign up!

I look forward to seeing you there and remember to Cut the BS! (I mean blood sugar.)

Categories
AttituDe of GratituDe inSOULin

Diabetes Blog Week 2015 Day 3: Clean it Out, Girl!

I’m trying to think of what I can clean out this week…I find myself a little emotionally raw from yesterday’s post so I’m gonna look for something that I physically hang on to.  I can’t imagine finding something that I phycially hang on to as something that is gonna set me off.

I decided to look at my supply shelf and realize that I am a sharps container hoarder. There I said it.  I don’t know why this is.  I must have like 5 of them and two on reserve still in the boxes they came in.  None of them are full..well maybe one of them is full.  I don’t know why I accumulate so many or feel the need to have multiple back up containers.  Should I get rid of them? Absolutely, what’s the use in hanging on to these things, well except to collect lancets, syringes, and pen needles?

Is it me or are these sharps containers like little plastic piggy banks for all my pokey devices?  At least a piggy bank will buy me a beer when its full.  The only thing a sharps container gives me when its full is the problem of disposing of it and the neccessity for a new one.

Oh little platic boxes that hold my pointy thingys…thank you for being there for me and helping me get rid of the pricks in my life. 🙂

 

Cut the BS girl talks about what Diabetes thing she's been hanging on to.
Like my homage to being from the westside?
 


Today’s Prompt:

Click for the Clean it Out – Wednesday 5/13 Link List.

Yesterday we kept stuff in, so today let’s clear stuff out.  What is in your diabetic closet that needs to be cleaned out?  This can be an actual physical belonging, or it can be something you’re mentally or emotionally hanging on to.  Why are you keeping it and why do you need to get rid of it?  (Thank you Rick of RA Diabetes for this topic suggestion.)

Categories
inSOULin

Diabetes Blog Week 2015 Day 2: Keep it to Yourself

People who know me know that I am generally a happy person.  Upon meeting people, I am smiling, cracking jokes, even making myself the butt of jokes just to make others feel comfortable around me.  I work on being a sunshiny person with rose colored lenses. (I love pink!) 

So, it is really a challenge for me to share this next post because it asks me to reflect on the types of stories you may not read from me for one reason or another.  Here goes:

I have a feeling you will not hear about the times when Diabetes just really gets me down.  I’m not talking about,   “Oh, I had a bad reading on my meter.” or “That last lancet really hurt!” down…more like Breakfast at Tiffany’s when Holly Golightly describes “The Mean Reds”.  I will probably not write about the times, when my optimism, inspiration and hope run slim.  Why? It is not really what I am about.  I feel no need to bring anyone down with me when I am there.  And most times, there just are no words to describe that place I find myself sometimes-even after only 3 years of diagnosis.  

Honestly, I believe it is enough to let you know I have those moments of darkness.

And so onward and upward, I will leave you with something that helps me when I just have no words.  The words of the famous Charlie Chaplin:

Smile, though your heart is aching
Smile, even though it’s breaking
When there are clouds in the sky
you’ll get by
If you smile through your fear and sorrow
Smile and maybe tomorrow
You’ll see the sun come shining through
for you
Light up your face with gladness
Hide every trace of sadness Although a tear may be ever so near
That’s the time you must keep on trying
Smile what’s the use of crying
You’ll find that life is still worthwhile
If you’ll just
Smile


Today’s Prompt:

Click for the Keep it to Yourself – Tuesday 5/12 Link List.

Many of us share lots of aspects of our diabetes lives online for the world to see.  What are some of the aspects of diabetes that you choose to keep private from the internet?  Or from your family and friends?  Why is it important to keep it to yourself?  (This is not an attempt to get you out of your comfort zone.  There is no need to elaborate or tell personal stories related to these aspects.  Simply let us know what kinds of stories we will never hear you tell, and why you won’t tell them.) (Thank you Scott E of Rolling in the D for this topic.)

Categories
AttituDe of GratituDe inSOULin

Diabetes Blog Week 2015 Day 1: I Can

Ideas have been floating in my mind about how I was going to start this week’s series of blogs.  This is my first Diabetes Blog Week, and honestly, I’m a little nervous.  How am I going to knock it out of the park?  

I thought about listing all the things I have been able to do since I was diagnosed.  I thought about the fact that after I got home from a week long stay at the hospital, my muscles had weakend and I couldn’t even get up the stairs without crying. And how with determination, I am now able to run up and down those stairs daily.  I thought about talking about my first time eating out at a restaurant with my husband and diabetes and how his encouragement of not being ashamed to check my blood sugars in public and take my insulin in public has given me the strength to be able to do so many other things with him, our girls, and diabetes.  I thought about all the places we have travelled to since then and the people with diabetes I’ve met along the way.  I thought about talking about my JDRF walk team #teamcuttheBS and how much we’ve raised together and how proud I am of the work we’ve done. 

Today’s post is meant to talk about something that I am proud of accomplishing.  And as proud as I am of all these things, nothing beats the text, email, or private message from one of my friends online who has been struggling with the notion of even checking his/her blood sugars.  When I get that message from someone after they see a post of my meter that reads 238mg/dl asking me how I responded or the message that says, “I checked mine today too!”  Or “I found my meter, I can start checking again.”  Or the beer someone bought me because she was no longer “pre-diabetic.”  I’d say those are the accomplishments I find most dear.  

Why? Because until I sat in a room where everyone else checked their blood sugars, every time I checked my blood sugar, I felt alone.  I find it impossible that I am the only person to feel this way.  Why did I feel alone? No one else had to do it, no one else really had to react at the number that comes up (unless it’s super low and I’m passed out on the floor,) and no one else around feels the guilt I do when the number is “out of range” high or low. Loneliness sucks and I wish it on no one.

If I can help someone to find the strength in themselves, to get out that effing meter, prick themselves and brave whatever number flashes on that screen, then I have it it me to do anything.