Diabetes Blog Week 2016 Day 1: Message Monday


I know I’m a little late in the game today.  How can I call myself a Diabetes Blogger if I don’t participate in Diabetes Blog Week.  It’s been so long.  But feels so good to be back here with you guys.

Why am I here?  Hmmm.  I’d say that I’m here in this diabetes blog space, because I am not special.  I was not different from anyone else I knew or didn’t know.  I was just like everyone else when I was diagnosed:  I could have been anyone’s wife, anyone’s mother, anyone’s friend.  So because I am not special and not any different from anyone else, I wanted everyone to know that if I’ve got this, you’ve got this.  I wanted people to know that this life, a life with diabetes, is one worth living and definitely worth enjoying.

I’m going to be honest and say I don’t spend much time in my blog about my difficulties and struggles.  I probably should. Difficulties and struggles do exist and they slow me down a bit sometimes but I won’t let that stop me.  I can’t.  There are too many people that need us to kick Diabetes’ ass every day.  From my family who need their mom/wife/daughter/friend, to people who are newly diagnosed who might need some guidance, to those who have gestational diabetes, to those who are told to watch what they eat because they are considered to have “pre-diabetes.”  I can’t let diabetes get me down, I have to keep keeping on, and I have to do with with a smile-I don’t know how else to do it.

I’ve done everything I’ve wanted to do despite having to carry around Diabetes and all the supplies it takes to attempt to keep it managed.  And you can too. 


Today’s Prompt

Lets kick off the week by talking about why we are here, in the diabetes blog space. What is the most important diabetes awareness message to you? Why is that message important for you, and what are you trying to accomplish by sharing it on your blog? (Thank you, Heather Gabel, for this topic suggestion.)

Charlie’s Tresiba Paint Scheme Confirmed!

If you read my post a couple weeks back, you’d know I thought Charlie Kimball’s #83 Novo Nordisk Indycar was painted a lot like Novo Nordisk’s new long-acting basal insulin, Tresiba.  Again, I’ve heard great things about this basal insulin in that it helps keep the BS closer to a heathy range with less occurence of hypoglycemia, or what we call, lows.  

Today, my husband brought to my attention that Racer Magazine posted an article about Charlie’s new paint scheme that is to be debuted at the Phoenix Gran Prix this weekend: 

And Boom!  It’s Tresiba all over that #83 Novo Nordisk car and your Cut the BS Girl called it over two weeks ago! What a rush!   

Charlie Kimball says,

“The new look of this car represents something very personal to me. Just as there have been advancements in racing, there have been advancements in the management of diabetes. The new look of my 2016 car represents another strong link between this program and the diabetes community…I am excited about the new design, not only because of the new look, but also because it represents the next phase in my effort to educate others.”

Clearly, I am excited and it represents something very personal to us too, Charlie.  

Race On!  Race with Insulin!

Watch Charlie and the #83 Tresiba car advocate for diabetes management on track as he takes the green flag on Saturday, April 2nd on NBCSN!  

Click here to read the full article at Racer.com.  

Charlie Kimball’s Indycar No Longer Blue and Orange? 

 In anticipation of the 2016 Indycar Season, my husband and I have been watching and following our favorite drivers.  One of my favorite drivers and PWD, Charlie Kimball, has been spotted with a new color scheme during practices and testing the last few weeks in Sonoma, Phoenix, and now St. Petersberg.  Here are a few shots:
 

Tell me that’s not a good looking car. (Photo:Indycar Series)
 
Looks good right, but there’s no more blue and orange. He’s still got Novo Nordisk sponsorship on the car, though. Now it’s got me thinking.  Is it me or does this color scheme look very similar to a newly released long acting insulin that I happen to hear amazing things about?  Amazing as in the potential to only have to take it every other day and a reduction in night time lows.  You tell me:

 
 

Tresiba® looks alot like Charlie’s 2016 Indycar to me. (Photo: NovoNordisk)
 

Wouldn’t it be cool to see a big ol’ Tresiba FlexTouch® on the sidepod of that Indycar?  I’d also love to see a ginormous Tresiba® Lollypop at thier pit box so Charlie knows where to stop!  

Watch Charlie this Sunday March 13th on ABC!  I know I will!

#Thankfulfor

  
Since the year started, I have been keeping this New Year’s resolution, that I would jot down something that I am thankful for everyday.  In previous years, I would have set up a spreadsheet for myself to fill in the blanks and measure my success, but not this year.  I have written my ‘Thankful For’s in one of two journals I keep, and sometimes, I’ve written them on a napkin and tossed it.  I’m going to be honest and say that I have fallen a few times in that I have not written something down everyday, but feel that I’ve built up the habit enough that I feel a void in my day if I didn’t do my #thankfulfor.

My #thankfulfors are varied from day-to-day.  Here are just a few things I have been thankful for:

  • Getting a new job.
  • New pen needles.
  • The whole family feeling healthy for a whole week.
  • Pink pens-I love pink!
  • The Diabetes Online Community (DOC)-you guys get me.
  • Family members getting to their destination safely.
  • Coffee.
  • That my arm is getting better after a Dexcom Rash.
  • Second cups of coffee.

I would go on but I’d end up being here all night.  I try to just keep it to one thing a day as more than that would pressure me to spend time I don’t really have.  A minute is all it took to write, “Today I am thankful for (fill in the blank.)”

Today is my birthday. So, today, I’m going to spend a little more than a minute.  There are so many things that I am thankful for, but to some them all up, I am thankful for another birthday.  I’m thankful for another day with my sexy husband and our beautifully creative, intelligent, and silly daughters.  I’m thankful for another day to be part of this Diabetes community.  I’m thankful that I get the opportunity to empathize and contribute in ways I never thought I’d could.  Lastly, for today, I’m thankful for diabetes reasearch which is why I am still here on this planet with you today.

My goal today, was to write for thirty minutes, and get back to blogging.  I’m pretty proud of myself for having 3 minutes to spare.  So, I guess I’m also thankful for goals. 

Second Person with Diabetes in Verizon Indycar Series for 2016 Season

 

Conor Daly, a racing driver and PWD, will be driving the No.18 car for Dale Coyne Racing in 2016! Watch him in action on NBC Sports and on ABC.
 
Yesterday, it was announced that Conor Daly, racecar driver and son of former Fomula One and Champ Car driver Derek Daly, will be driving full time with Dale Coyne Racing for the 2016 Verizon Indycar Series season.  Ok, so why am I writing about this on our Diabetes Blog?  Conor Daly will be the second Indycar driver to represent us People with Diabetes.  Who is the first? Charlie Kimball of Novo Nordisk Chip Ganassi Racing.  I am beyond excited!
Conor has been driving in some form since he was 10 years old.  He’s been around Indycar driving all his life since he’s dad was in racing.  He’s driven in racing series all over the globe including Formula Mazda, GP2, GP3, Formula One (as a test driver for Sahara Force India,), Indy Lights, and now a full-time ride at Indycar.  You may also have seen him in well known races as the 24 hours of Daytona and the Indianapolis 500.

“This is truly the most meaningful announcement of my career,” said Conor Daly. “After experiencing what I have in my career, especially the last three years, it is an incredible honor and opportunity to work with Dale Coyne Racing for a full season. To be able to go head to head and take the fight to other drivers every weekend is very exciting. I cannot thank Jonathan Byrd’s Hospitality & Restaurant Group and all of Jonathan Byrd’s Racing’s partners enough for their effort in putting this program together. I am ready to get to work and try my best to outwork everyone else in the field every weekend to get results for this team.”

What does that say to me?  It says that we have an exciting and competitive year of Indycar racing ahead of us.  Conor Daly was diagnosed with Type One Diabetes in 2007 when he was 15 years old.  (Eerie tidbit, Charlie Kimball was also diagnosed in 2007.) Back to Conor: If you look at his driving accomplishments, you will find that his biggest accomplishments were made post diagnosis, so take that Diabetes!

I cannot wait to see him in action this year.  I also cannot wait to buy myself a Conor Daly/Dale Coyne     T-shirt to get my selfie on in.  Much like my Charlie Kimball selfies!

To read more on Conor Daly, go to his website at http://www.conordaly.net and follow him at on Twitter at @conordaly22 . 

Cut the BS…I mean Blood Sugar, y’all!!!

 

My second most memorable Long Beach Gran Prix!

In honor of this year’s Indy 500, I thought I’d finally post this blog I’ve been sitting on for 2 years!  This was the first Long beach Gran Prix I’d been to since I was diagnosed.  I’ve gone pretty much every year since 2003.  Here’s the post: 

I just had the most amazing weekend!

So, I’ve become quite the Indycar fan by association.  My husband was a huge fan when we met and he started going to the Long Beach Gran Prix 2000.  I started going shortly after in 2003.  Needless to say, I was very excited as it was my first race I attended since my diagnosis on June 28, 2012.  Going as a newly diagnosed T1D, you know I was there as a huge Charlie Kimball fan.  I was a fan of his before my diagnosis, but now it’s personal.

On Friday, we walked the pits, and I found Charlie Kimball’s pit box…so I had to get a picture while sporting my Super Duper Handy Dandy Novolog FlexPen!

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On Saturday, We went to the Indycar fan village where the Race with Insulin tent was up. There, I got to sign up for a chance to win a VIP trip for four to the final race of the year in Fontana, CA. After entering, I was able to sign this shell of Charlie’s car.  

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I love this guy.  I’m so happy, Ryan introduced me to this sport.

As I was there talking to the Novo Nordisk people, I told them that I was gonna come back for the Question and Answer Session with Charlie and have him sign my Novolog Flexpen. They told me that there would be a special line for Novolog Users and to see their marketing person to make sure I was in the right line!  Oh boy! Oh boy!

I was the only adult in the special VIP (Very Insulin-dependent Person) line that day!  I got to tell him my story of the fact that I had been diagnosed last year and that when they told me I had diabetes, I hoped I was prescribed Novolog so I can support Charlie even more!  The weekend I came home from the hospital after being diagnosed, Charlie drove to his first podium finish in Toronto.  He placed second.  I like to think he did for me.

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I had to make sure I took another picture after getting my Charlie swag!

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As always, it was a gret race day.  What made this one even better was at the end of the day, Ryan and I were able to sail away into the sunset with a great friend. 

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…And then this happened…about a month later!  I thought they skipped my part since they showed Charlie with all the kids that day but, nope, check for this Cut the BS Girl’s story at 13:14!

Some of you may be wondering what my most memorable Long Beach Gran Prix is.  It was in 2003 when I got engaged to the most amazing man after the race! I’ve been quite the fan ever since.  The only two Long Beach Gran Prix I’ve missed are the years we welcomed our daughters into the world.  

  

My Diabetes Personified

Go figure: Friday came along, I blinked, and Diabetes Blog Week was over.  I want to thank Karen Graffeo of www.bittersweetdiabetes.com for organizing this and bringing me back to blogging.  It really is something that I enjoy and I hope those of you who read Cut the BS…I mean Blood Sugar can tell.  

I was in the process of writing this post and I still would love to share it with you, so here it is:

Today’s post was supposed to be about food.  I’ve posted about food before and I will post about food again so I decided to write about one of the wildcard topics.  It asks me to personify my diabetes.  

As much as I’d like to call my Diabetes every horrible name in the book, I recall  referring to myself as a D-Toddler at the Diabetes unConference in Las Vegas this year.  The more I think about it the more  I find that is a better personification of my Diabetes.  For me, it’s like having an additional child.  

I’m a mother of two young women, both under the age of ten, and I find that in being a parent, my husband and I have to take the lead and make decisions for them.  I can’t expect my diabetes to take care of itself.  I have to keep a watchful eye on my diabetes, just like my girls.  It is my responsiblity if my girls hurt themselves because I did not set boudaries or check in with them soon enough.  It is my responsibility if one of my girls end up with her head between the stair railings or my blood sugars get too high and it is my responsibilty to get her head out of there or get my blood sugar back to a healthy range.  Luckily, no one’s ever gotten her head stuck between the railings at our house. 

Similarly to having a child, having diabetes takes some getting used to.  With time, I’ve gotten the hang of it and can roll with the punches.  Diabetes has it’s routines just like babies and toddlers have their routines and by the time I get used to the routines, the children and the diabetes change on me and I have to adapt.  There are fears and frustrations upon being a parent, but there are also little joys and victories like the first time all of us slept through the night or the times I make changes in my treatment and it happens to work.  Both have resulted in funky victory dance.

Differences?

The difference is my children will eventually grow up and make decisions of thier own based on their experiences in life.  My diabetes will always depend on me to make decisions to keep both of us in line.  I know that there are devices and surgical procedures in the works that might make decisions for me in the future, but my body will never correct itself or appologize when we are not in agreement.  My daughters and I have already corrected ourselvs and appologized to each other countless times in my tenure as a mother.  Diabetes will always be a part of me just like my girls are, but I will probably never love my Diabetes and I doubt that I will ever be proud of my Diabetes.  Needless to say, but I will, I very much love my girls and my husband and am very proud of every accomplishment they make along the way. 

My relationship with my diabetes has evolved, just like my relationship with my girls.  And through the years, it will continue to evolve.  But some things will always remain: I will always be Mom and I will always be a Person with Diabetes.

  

Click for the Diabetes Personified Wildcard Link List.

If you could personify your diabetes or that of your loved one, what would it be like?  What would it look like, what would it say, what kind of personality would it have?  Use your imagination and feel free to use images, drawings, words, music, etc. to describe it.  (Thank you Reva of Type ONEderful for this topic suggestion.)